Arthur Boto Conley's Music Workshop Presents "Trance & Glasses" | TBG01

by Travel By Goods

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    Including a PDF of the original's 7-page booklet.
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  • Limited Edition 12" Vinyl (In Gatefold-Cover + 9-Page Booklet)
    Record/Vinyl + Digital Album

    Includes unlimited streaming of Arthur Boto Conley's Music Workshop Presents "Trance & Glasses" | TBG01 via the free Bandcamp app, plus high-quality download in MP3, FLAC and more.

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"In an isolated section of Art Cologne 2011, among art books, artists’ books, and artists’ multiples, I came across a record with a curious collage on its cover. A triangular vignette revealed the contents: 12" White Label Arthur Boto Conley’s Music Workshop #01 Trance & Glasses. Though my chosen form of consuming art has almost always been limited to looking, paying twelve euros for an album felt natural enough. Back home, I listened to my purchase and leafed through the album insert. Images of ornate, pre-modern vases and people in states of trance populate all but one page. The final page describes Arthur Boto Conley’s adventures in India, Bali, Morocco, and Haiti in the early 80s, when he traveled around with a programmable drum machine and a bass synthesizer recording music with locals. The story unfolded to the A-side’s deep, steady bass; crunchy hi-hats; and recurrent, ethereal melody. Conley, following in the vein of Dutch ethnomusicologist Jaap Kunst, worked with musicians who played at healing ceremonies and vodou rites. One of the melodies, I read, was recorded by a gamelan orchestra in south-west Bali. On the B-side’s first track, a Hammond organ accompanies an ecstatic symphony of Moroccan karkaba cymbals. Conley’s beat machine, a Roland TB-303, dominates the second track; the driving bass tones were designed in collaboration with Haitian drummers to mimic the traditional »moose call« technique."
John Beeson, Spike Art Quarterly, Vienna, 2012

credits

released March 1, 2011

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